Didactics

Get our residency brochure by clicking below. (PDF)

The Department of Emergency Medicine at OSU has a strong academic history. Although it is impossible to replace hands-on experience, a variety of non-clinical formats are employed to complement this learning.
 

back to top

Conferences

 
The Emergency Medicine lecture series takes place on Wednesday mornings. The traditional lecture sessions covering the core content of emergency medicine is augmented by several repeating conferences. We host a monthly multi-disciplinary trauma morbidity and mortality session that is regularly attended by colleagues which make up the multi-disciplinary trauma care team as well as staff from the medical examiner's office. Emergency Medicine M&M also occurs monthly, providing an opportunity to discuss difficult cases in a collegial and collaborative setting. During pediatric and adult ED follow-up, residents present interesting cases in an oral board format, allowing the opportunity to not only discuss the salient medical aspects of the cases but also to review and practice strategies for successful completion of the ABEM oral board exam.
 

back to top

Presentations

 
All residents present one prepared lecture per year. These lectures are drawn from a variety of appropriate topics chosen at the beginning of each year. While these lectures are modeled after traditional one-hour PowerPoint presentations, an emphasis is placed on discussion and audience participation. Accordingly, residents are encouraged to be creative in their approach to presenting their topic. Recent examples include expert panels of both EM and non-EM faculty, and the use of social media to solicit real-time audience input.
 
  • Intern presentations are done in groups of four with the guidance of a faculty member. These presentations consist of several cases followed by a literature review over a common or controversial topic in EM. During the case presentations there is a panel of faculty who present their approach/opinions on the case in an open forum/debate format. These sessions are well attended by faculty and consistently receive outstanding reviews.
  • Second year residents present a one-hour session on a specific topic selected from the expansive core content in emergency medicine.
  • In addition to a core content-focused presentation, residents in their third year also organize and lead a skills lab session covering both common and uncommon EM procedures.
 

back to top

Reading Club

 
Part of our asynchronous curriculum, the reading club is currently undergoing a transformation. We currently use Access EM, a web-based curriculum that utilizes not only selections from many major EM and IM texts, but also multimedia tools, podcasts, and other educational modalities. Our goal was to create a curriculum that will be repeated every eighteen months so that topics are covered twice, once during the beginning of training, and a second time when the resident has more clinical experience in which to frame the material.
 

back to top

EMS

Intern EMS Exercise
 
The EMS experience is directed by Dr. David Keseg and has recently been adapted in response to resident feedback. Residents learn the skills necessary to become an EMS director by completing assigned readings, ride-alongs, and attending EMS specific lectures throughout the residency program. Residents also deliver a lecture to EMS personnel in their second and third years. Additionally, the Department of Emergency Medicine houses the Ohio State University Center for EMS. Several faculty members serve as medical directors for local fire departments and Dr. Howie Werman is the medical director for MedFlight of Ohio. Third year residents are given the option to fly or ride along with MedFlight to fulfill part of the EMS requirements. More information about the EMS curriculum, including the list of requirements, can be found by clicking on the EMS link.
 

back to top

Journal Club

 
Journal club typically occurs on the last Wednesday of each month, when residents and attendings gather to discuss journal articles over lunch. These sessions begin with a review of a basic research or statistical topic, followed by the presentation of three articles selected to address a particular clinical question. Journal club is attended by faculty with a wide variety of research and clinical interests, allowing residents to draw on multiple experiences and viewpoints as they learn to navigate the medical literature.
 

back to top

Skills Lab

Skill Lab
 
We are lucky at OSU to have access to the state of the art Clinical Skills Center, and take advantage of this resource monthly during our skills labs. Coordinated and led by senior resident/faculty pair, skills lab sessions make use of both high- and low-fidelity simulators, animal and cadaveric models, volunteer patients, and occasionally even each other to review and practice EM-relevant skills. We are also fortunate to have non-EM colleagues who are often willing to lend their expertise to these activities.
 
Recent skills labs have included the following:
 
  • Obstetrics: Residents reviewed and practiced first trimester ultrasound on a phantom model, as well as third trimester ultrasound on a pregnant volunteer. A station covering both normal and complicated deliveries was led by an OB/GYN faculty member with an interest in education.
  • ENT: Epistaxis treatment was discussed and then practiced using a low-fidelity model. Drainage and treatment of auricular hematomas was reviewed with the use of a cadaveric model. Finally, residents were given the opportunity to perform nasopharyngoscopy on a volunteer under the direction of a speech therapist and ENT resident.
  • Airway: Residents gained familiarity with a variety of adjunct/rescue airway devices and technique using both mannequins and cadavers, all under the direction of experienced EM faculty.
 

back to top

Small Group Discussions

 
EM residents are divided into 4 small group discussions with two EM attendings as facilitators. The small groups are made up of residents from all levels and meet monthly for a two-hour session. Topics are usually selected based on resident requests and have included oral board review, end of life care in the ED, ventilator management (including several residents being "treated" with non-invasive positive pressure ventilation), and mock EMS base station calls.
 
We highly value our small group sessions for multiple reasons. The small group format emphasizes a personal approach to education that we regard highly at Ohio State. We firmly believe that, as adult learners, residents should have a certain amount of control over what they learn, and the small group format affords us this curricular latitude. There is no set small group curriculum; groups are encouraged to be creative in their exploration of the nuances of emergency medicine. Additionally, residents are able to draw not only on the experiences of faculty members, but also work collaboratively to teach one another, enhancing our "residency family" environment.
 
​​

back to top